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Royal Wedding BBQ safety warning

May 18 2018
Stock image: The damage after fuel was used to ignite a BBQ

Stock image: The damage after fuel was used to ignite a BBQ

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service is warning people to take extra caution when using barbecues.

“We understand that people will want to celebrate the Royal Wedding by having a drink or two but if you’re in charge of a barbeque, or cooking in anyway, please don’t drink too much as it will increase the likelihood of a fire starting or something generally going wrong.”

Paul Shaw, Strategic Partnership Lead

The warning comes ahead of the country celebrating the Royal Wedding of HRH Prince Harry and Meghan on Saturday May 19. With temperatures set to soar it is expected many will hold barbecues to enjoy the weather with friends and family.

Paul Shaw, Strategic Partnership Lead, said: “We are set to have some excellent weather over the weekend and while we want you to enjoy it – we want you to stay safe at the same time.

“It is vital not to leave a lit barbecue unattended, even for a few minutes, or to use accelerants to light it. It is also really important to ensure the barbecue is put out properly when you are finished with it, any hot coals should be placed in water.

“We understand that people will want to celebrate the Royal Wedding by having a drink or two but if you’re in charge of a barbeque, or cooking in anyway, please don’t drink too much as it will increase the likelihood of a fire starting or something generally going wrong.”

The Service has put together the following top tips for summer safety:

  • Never leave a barbecue unattended, especially when there are children or pets around
  • Make sure your barbecue is well away from sheds, fences, trees, shrubs or garden waste
  • Only light a barbecue with appropriate fuels, NEVER use petrol or white spirit
  • Always keep water nearby
  • Enjoy yourself but don’t drink too much if you are in charge of a barbecue
  • Never take a barbecue into an enclosed space, such as a tent – the carbon monoxide it gives off could be fatal.